Go (Energy)

I created Go as an easy to use, practical remedy to increase energy, fight fatigue, and improve mental clarity. It is perfect for situations in which you need to be at your best, be it an important meeting, a study session or class that requires intense focus, before a workout or after to improve recovery time, or landing in a new place to explore after a long flight.

The herbs used in Go are known for their energy boosting, and adaptogenic properties and have been used for more than 2,500 years in Asian cultures to treat fatigue, and poor concentration.

What’s in Go?

The principle herbs Hong Jin Tian (Radix Rhodiola Rosea) and Dang Shen (Radix Codonopsis) are strong to build qi (energy) and are considered adaptogenic herbs. Adaptogenic herbs are known to strengthen the body’s response to stress, enabling the body to more readily “adapt” to different environments and stressors. Studies have shown that Hong Jin Tian has an anti-fatigue effect, increases mental performance and concentration, and decreases the cortisol response in cases of adrenal fatigue.*

Bai Zhu (Rhizoma Atractylodes Macrocephalae), and Fu Ling (Poria) are both known for their ability to treat fatigue, and boost metabolism. Xiang Fu (Rhizoma Cyperi) is included in the formula to regulate our energy, which supports sustained energy levels

How is it prepared?

Prepared as a tincture, the herbs are soaked in grain or cane alcohol for a minimum of 30 days. This process extracts the active ingredients, creating an effective and potent preparation. Three dropperfuls of the tincture can be taken with 1 – 2 ounces of warm water up to 3 times per day, or on a as needed basis for increased energy and concentration.

I have used herbs like the ones in Go for more than 20-years and have found that it is best taken whenever a boost in energy, mental clarity and focus is needed.

For more information about the herbs in any of my formulas, check out these vast reference texts!

Bensky, D., Clavey, S., Stoger, E., Gamble, A., (2004). Chinese Herbal Medicine Materia Medica, 3rd Edition. Eastland Press, Seattle, WA.
Cannon, C., (2016). The Contemporary Herbalist: Understanding Chinese Herbal Medicine Part I. Honolulu, HI.
Chen, J. K., Chen, T. T., & Crampton, L. (2004). Chinese medical herbology and pharmacology (Vol. 369). City of Industry, CA: Art of Medicine Press.

*(ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19016404)

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